GERMAN COMPOSER AND PIANIST MARTIN KOHLSTEDT COLLABORATES WITH LEIPZIG'S GEWANDHAUSCHOR FOR GROUND-BREAKING NEW PROJECT: 'STRÖME'

Release Date: 3rd May 2019
Label: Warner Classics
Format: LP // CD // Digital
KSYCHA (feat. GewandhausChor) is now available on all digital platforms

After two years of development, including adventurous, public rehearsals, German composer and pianist Martin Kohlstedt is set to release a bold, improvisational collaboration with the 70 person GewandhausChor - Leipzig's renowned 150-year old choir - entitled 'STRÖME' ('Currents').

Kohlstedt has released two solo piano albums: 'Tag' (2012) & 'Nacht' (2014) and in 2017 he released his third record 'Strom' which also features electronic instrumentation. STRÖME is the latest refinement of a Kohlstedt snapshot. On this album, Martin Kohlstedt's modular compositions – not ‘works’ as such, but rather compendiums of interconnecting musical ideas – once again break new terrain. Kohlstedt resonates with the choir, and above all with its director Gregor Meyer, sparking emotional impulses between the singers and indirectly stimulating movement in their bodies. As participants in this experiment, the members of the GewandhausChor adopted innovative musical methods, not working from traditional notation. Each singer was free to take individual creative initiatives. A wealth of patience was required on both sides and a fundamental tension courses through all the recordings, which draw to electrifying effect on modules from previous albums. Martin Kohlstedt is known for music that exercises a magnetic power and here it draws performers and listeners into a field of social warmth, of intimate negotiation, of breaking away and coming together.

With STRÖME, Martin Kohlstedt leaves us in no doubt as to the power that lies in the presence of real, live performers. As they strive for a shared sensibility, they become a ceremonial community that subsumes the listener. This makes STRÖME into an almost archaic, but highly energetic phenomenon. It is also daring, in that it pulls off the masterstroke of making a classically trained chorus fundamental to Kohlstedt’s free association. Everybody involved is pushed to their limits and this is precisely what makes the instrumental and vocal elements meld time and again into something that is both elevated and eternally new.

 

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